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Pipetting samples into DNA sequencerEvolution
Evolution
Researchers monitoring wetland areaBioavailability
Bioavailability
Processing samples in organics labTrophic Ecology
Trophic Ecology
Geochemical reactions in small pool seen by green and brown coloursGeochemistry
Geochemistry
Invasive Golden Star tunicateInvasion Biology
Invasion Biology
Student sampling water in wetland areaAquatic Ecology
Aquatic Ecology
Bacterium feeding on arsenicBiogeochemistry
Biogeochemistry

Hugh MacIsaac

Photo of Dr. Hugh MacIsaac

Professor

Department of Fisheries and Oceans Invasive Species Research Chair

Director, Canadian Aquatic Invasive Species Network (CAISN)
 
Phone: 519-253-3000 x3754 Office: GLIER Rm 134
e-mail:  Hugh MacIsaac

 

 EDUCATION

Ph.D. 1990, Department of Biology, Darmouth College, Hanover, NH, USA
M.Sc. 1986, Botany Department, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
B.Sc. 1983, Department of Biology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada

PAST ACADEMIC POSITIONS

  • Associate Professor, Biology Department, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada. 1997-2000
  • Assistant Professor, Biology Department, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada. 1992-1997
  • NSERC Postdoctoral fellow, Zoology Department, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, 1990-1992.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

We are interested in a broad variety of questions pertaining to invasion biology, particularly with respect to aquatic ecosystems (inland lakes, Great Lakes, marine estuaries). While most of our tests are based on aquatic organisms, we occasionally stray from this model and utilize terrestrial taxa or systems. Our questions range from fundamental questions such as what determinants affect species invasion patterns in general, to more applied topics such as how can we best prevent ship-mediated invasions of the Great Lakes or spread of species to inland lakes.
 

RECENT NEWS

Hugh MacIsaac will lead a team of researchers in the next phase of the Canadian Aquatic Invasive Species Network (CAISN).  The group was awarded $6.5 million from NSERC for their research on aquatic invasive species.  The announcement was made in February, 2011.  Read the full news article.

Hugh MacIsaac was awarded the Frank H. Rigler Award by the Society of Canadian Limnologists.  The award is given for research which has great impact and importance in the field of limnology.  Read the full news article.

 
RECENT AND SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

* Denotes students and post-docs   ^Denotes visiting scientist

Adebayo*, A.A., E. Briski*, O. Kalaci*, M. Hernandez*, S. Ghabooli*, B. Beric, F.T. Chan*, A. Zhan*, E. Fifield, T. Leadley and H.J. MacIsaac. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and water lettuce (Pistia stratiodes) in the Great Lakes: playing with fire? Aquatic Invasions (in press)

Bailey, S.A., M.G. Deneau, L. Jean, C.J. Wiley, B. Leung, and H.J. MacIsaac. 2011. Evaluating efficacy of an environmental policy to prevent biological invasions. Environmental Science and Technology (accepted).

Muirhead*, J.R., M.A. Lewis and H.J. MacIsaac. 2011. Prediction and error in multi-stage models for spread of aquatic invasive species. Diversity and Distributions 17:323-337.

Sylvester*, F. O. Kalaci*, B. Leung, T. Therriault, A. Lacoursière-Roussel, F.M. Choi, Cathryn C. Murray, M.A. Bravo and H.J. MacIsaac. 2011. Invasion vectors: can simple models explain a complex problem? Journal of Applied Ecology (in press). doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2011.01957.x

Bock, D.G., A. Zhan*, H.J. MacIsaac and M.E. Cristescu. 2011. Looking at both sides of biological invasions: patterns of spread of the colonial violet tunicate Botrylloides violaceus in North America. Molecular Ecology (accepted)

MacIsaac, H.J. Lakes. 2011. In: Encyclopedia on Introduced Invasive Species. D. Simberloff and M. Rejmanek (eds), University of California Press. (in press; invited)

Briski*, E., M.E. Cristescu, S.A. Bailey, and H J. MacIsaac. 2010. Identification of invertebrate species using resting eggs and molecular markers. Freshwater Biology (in press).

Ghabooli*, S., T.A. Shiganova, A. Zhan*, M.E. Cristescu, P. Eghtesadi-Araghi and H.J. MacIsaac. 2010. Multiple introductions and invasion pathways for the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in Eurasia. Biological Invasions (in press)

Lejeusne*, C., H.J. MacIsaac, T.W. Therriault, D. Bock and M.E. Cristescu. 2010. Comparative phylogeography of two colonial ascidians reveals contrasting invasion histories. Biological Invasions (in press)

Briski*, E., S.A. Bailey, M.E. Cristescu and H.J. MacIsaac. 2010. Efficacy of regulations in protecting the Great Lakes from biological invasions via ships' ballast water. Biological Invasions 55:2414-2424.

Zhan*, A., H.J. MacIsaac and M.E. Cristescu. 2010. Invasion genetics of the Ciona intestinalis species complex: from regional endemism to global homogeneity. Molecular Ecology 19:4678-4694.

Kipp, R., S.A. Bailey, H.J. MacIsaac and A. Ricciardi. 2010. Transoceanic ships as vectors for nonindigenous freshwater bryozoans. Diversity and Distributions 16:77-83.

Rup*, M.P., S.A. Bailey, C.J. Wiley, M.S. Minton, A. Miller, G.M. Ruiz & H.J. MacIsaac. 2010. Domestic ballast operations on the Great Lakes: Potential importance of Lakers as a vector for introduction and spread of nonindigenous species. Can. J. Fish & Aquat Sci. 67:417-426

Bradie*,J.N., S.A. Bailey, G. van der Velde and H.J. MacIsaac. 2010.  Brine-induced mortality of nonindigenous species in ballast water.  Marine Environmental Research 70:395-410.

Sylvester*, F. & H.J. MacIsaac. 2010. Is vessel hull fouling an invasion threat to the Great Lakes? Diversity & Distributions 16:132-143.

Gray*, D. & H.J. MacIsaac. 2010. Do zooplankton eggs remain viable despite exposure to open-ocean ballast water exchange: evidence from in situ exposure experiments. Canadian Journal of Fisheries & Aquatic Sciences (in press)

Kipp, R., S.A. Bailey, H.J. MacIsaac & A. Ricciardi. 2010. Transoceanic ships as vectors for nonindigenous freshwater bryozoans. Diversity and Distributions 16:77-83.

MacIsaac, H.J., R. Tedla* & A. Ricciardi. 2010. Patterns and rate of growth of studies in invasion ecology. In: 50 Years of Invasion Ecology. D. Richardson (ed). (in press)

Ricciardi, A. & H.J. MacIsaac. 2010. Impacts of biological invasions on freshwater ecosystems. In: 50 Years of Invasion Ecology. D. Richardson (ed). (in press)

Harvey*, C.T., S.A. Qureshi* & H.J. MacIsaac.2009. Detection of colonizing nonindigenous species. Diversity & Distributions 15:429-437.

Ellis*, S. & H.J. MacIsaac. 2009. Salinity tolerance of Great Lakes’ invaders. Freshwater Biology 54:77-89.

Jacobs*, M. & H.J. MacIsaac. 2009. Modeling spread of the invasive macrophyte Cabomba caroliniana. Freshwater Biology 54:296-305.

Kelly*, D., G. Lamberti, & H.J. MacIsaac. 2009. Laurentian Great Lakes as a case study in biological invasion. In: ISIS Bioeconomics of Biological Invasions. pages 205-225. Oxford Univ. Press.

Steinberg*, A., J. Ejsmont-Karabin, J.R. Muirhead* and HJ. MacIsaac. 2009. Spatial and temporal stability of rotifer communities. Hydrobiologia 624:107-114.

Ricciardi, A. & H.J. MacIsaac. 2008. Is current ballast water exchange policy sufficient to protect the Great Lakes from ship-vectored invasions? Ecological Applications 18:1321-1323.

Jacobs*, M.J. and H.J. MacIsaac. 2008. Modeling spread of the invasive macrophyteCabomba caroliniana. Freshwater Biology 54:296-305.

Ellis*, S. and H.J. MacIsaac. 2008. Salinity tolerance of Great Lakes’ invaders. Freshwater Biology 45:77-89.

Ricciardi, A. and H.J. MacIsaac. 2008. Is current ballast water exchange policy sufficient to protect the Great Lakes from ship-vectored invasions? Ecological Applications 18:1321-1323.

Ricciardi, A. and H.J. MacIsaac. 2008. The rise of invasion ecology. Charles Elton’s fifty year old text is now cited more than ever. Nature 452:34.

Herborg*, L.-M., N.E. Mandrak, B.C. Cudmore & H.J. MacIsaac. 2007. Comparative distribution and invasion risk of snakehead (Channidae) and Asian carp (Cyprinidae) species in North America. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 64:1723-1735.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • Hull fouling as a mechanism of introduction of species
  • Ballast water treatment
  • Invasion theory
  • Genetic structure of invading species

CURRENT GRADUATE STUDENTS

  • Marco Hernandez, (PhD candidate -GLIER)
  • Remi Abisola, (MSc candidate - GLIER)
  • Farrah Chan (M.Sc. candidate – GLIER)
  • Sara Ghabooli (Ph.D. candidate – GLIER)
  • Tony Wang (M.Sc. candidate – GLIER)

CURRENT POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWS

  • Aibin Zhan
  • Elizabeta Briski
     

CURRICULUM VITAE

PERSONAL WEBSITE

CAISN WEBSITE