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Undergraduate Environmental Research Symposium

Add this event into your calendar using the iCAL format
  • Thu, 04/06/2017 - 9:30am - 1:00pm




9:30 AM Sanjay Rasiah  
  Cold Region Hydrology: A Modelled Assessment of Winter Nutrient Runoff Processes
 
Winter nutrient losses within the Laurentian Great Lakes watersheds region have a significant impact on agricultural crop yields, as well as the overall quality of neighbouring surface waters. During the fall season, semi-saturated soil begins to freeze, followed by snow cover accumulation throughout the winter. Snowmelt then occurs during the early spring, playing a major role in overland flows. If the maximum water content is lesser than the uppermost soil layer’s soil moisture content, saturation-excess overland flows can develop which are a major factor of winter nutrient runoff.  To develop an understanding of the dynamics and impacts involved in winter nutrient loss, modelling snow accumulation and water flow patterns within watersheds is essential. Winter nutrient losses within the Laurentian Great Lakes watersheds region have a significant impact on agricultural crop yields, as well as the overall quality of neighbouring surface waters. During the fall season, semi-saturated soil begins to freeze, followed by snow cover accumulation throughout the winter. Snowmelt then occurs during the early spring, playing a major role in overland flows. If the maximum water content is lesser than the uppermost soil layer’s soil moisture content, saturation-excess overland flows can develop which are a major factor of winter nutrient runoff.  To develop an understanding of the dynamics and impacts involved in winter nutrient loss, modelling snow accumulation and water flow patterns within watersheds is essential.
  Supervisor: Dr. Chris Wellen
Co-Supervisor: Dr. Aaron Fisk
 
10:00 AM Grace Enns – Environmental Science  
 
Phosphate Distribution in Water and Sediment of the Detroit River
  This study investigates phosphate concentrations found in water and sediment samples throughout the Detroit River. Potential sources and the possible impacts of these concentrations are assessed.
  Supervisor: Dr. Scott Mundle
Co-Reader: Dr. Joel Gagnon
 
10:30 AM Joelle Pecz – Environmental science  
 
Biogeochemical Investigation of Arsenic Speciation in Yangonghai Lake Sediments
  Chemical, mineralization and biological arsenic recycling in the water-sediment interface is investigated.
 

Supervisor:  Dr. Chris Weisener
Co-Reader:  Dr. Joel Gagnon

11:00 AM BREAK  
11:30 AM Ke Hu – Environmental Science  
 
Computational Investigation into Hydrogeological Factors in Controlling Solute Transport in Groundwater System
 

Many factors play an important role in determining how solutes, such as a landfill leachate, are distributed in sub-surfaces, including hydraulic properties of underground structures, precipitation rate, local groundwater pattern, and solute density. The proposed research project will address the above-mentioned factors using computational simulation upon a highly conceptualized hydrogeological model.

 
  Supervisor:   Dr. Jianwen Yang
Co-Supervisor: Dr. Joel Gagnon
 
12:00 PM Rebecca Shearon – Environmental Studies  
  Road Dust Classification and Distribution Within Windsor
 

A study looking at the chemical composition and physical characteristics of road dusts collected from various sites across Windsor and the relationship of these compositions, especially heavy metals, across sample sites and within   sample sites.

 

Supervisor: Ms. Alice Grgicak-Mannion
Co-Supervisor: Dr. J. Gagnon

12:30 PM Amalia Despenic
  Spatial Trends and Particle Identification of Trace Particles on the Leaves of Tilian Cordata in Windsor, Ontario
  Windsor, Ontario has high vehicular traffic and multiple industrial sites within or surrounding the city, which results in the release of heavy metal particulate matter into the atmosphere and may contribute to adverse respiratory health issues. The use of tree leaves as particulate matter bio-monitors has become increasingly popular and they can be used to identify and quantify these particles. The objective of this study is to determine if there are any spatial trends in particulate matter throughout the City of Windsor by comparing heavy metal concentrations found in Tilia cordata (little leaf linden) leaves from 2010 and 2016. The identification and classification of these particles will also be looked at.
 

Supervisor: Ms. Alice Grgicak-Mannion
Co-Supervisor: Dr. Joel Gagnon

 



Marg Mayer
mmayer@uwindsor.ca
(519)253-3000 ext.2528