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CRRAR Student Fellows

***Student Fellows--Fall 2014****

 

Jane Elizabeth McArthur

I have an undergraduate and a Master’s Degree in Communication and Social Justice and am currently in my first year of the PhD Programme in Sociology/Social Justice at University of Windsor. In both the academic and employment realm, I have been committed to the exploration of the ways in which power relations effect society’s perceptions of occupational and environmental health issues. I tend to favour the methodological and theoretical approaches which have activism or change embedded in them and in particular the idea that words as they help construct the social world can also serve to change it. It has been my intent to further pursue research into the mainstream media constructions of breast cancer from the point of view that prevention, occupation and environment are lacking in the discourse, although there are many issues of social relevance which through critical discourse analysis could reveal a great deal about the world we live in as well as ways in which paradigm shifts could alter those discourses towards a more just existence.

 

 

Michael Yong-Set

 
Michael Andrew Yong-Set did his undergraduate honours degree in philosophy and psychology at York University in Toronto. While there, he studied: Argumentation Theory under Michael A. Gilbert; formal logic; informal logic; metalogic and contemporary analytic epistemology.
 
As a Master's student, he is investigating something that he is calling 'Re-Situating the Logical within the Rhetorical' - which is an attempt to understand how to integrate formal systems of logic within rhetorical frameworks of argumentation. Re-discovering the relevance of formal symbolic logic in the context of real argument may or may not require an exciting re-conception of the nature of logic itself.
 
Sharpening and precisifying the understanding of the link between logic and real argument would be a great boon for the pedagogical practices of teaching both informal logic and formal logic.
 

 

 

***Student Fellows--Winter 2014***

 

Laura Nicola

Laura Nicola began the University of Windsor's  Philosophy MA Program in September 2013. Her interests in argumentation concentrate on the legal field, particularly in regards to the connections between the jurisprudential system as we know it and the accounts of legal argumentation offered by Golding, Feteris, Bickenbach and especially Toulmin. Her research interests partially coincide with Dr. Hansen’s studies on the rhetorical analysis of Louis Riel’s speeches within the legal setting of his time; they are also related to the works of Douglas Walton on Legal and Critical Argumentation.
 
 

Michael Andrew Yong-Set did his undergraduate honours degree in philosophy and psychology at York University in Toronto. While there, he studied: Argumentation Theory under Michael A. Gilbert; formal logic; informal logic; metalogic and contemporary analytic epistemology.
 
As a Master's student, he is investigating something that he is calling 'Re-Situating the Logical within the Rhetorical' - which is an attempt to understand how to integrate formal systems of logic within rhetorical frameworks of argumentation. Re-discovering the relevance of formal symbolic logic in the context of real argument may or may not require an exciting re-conception of the nature of logic itself.
 
Sharpening and precisifying the understanding of the link between logic and real argument would be a great boon for the pedagogical practices of teaching both informal logic and formal logic.
 
 

Matthew Pezzaniti

(2nd term, see below for full details)

 

 

 

***Student Fellows -- Autumn 2013***

 

Faizal Forrester

Faizal Forrester

I am currently in the second year of the MA in English Literature, Language and Creative Writing at the University of Windsor. My thesis will bring together my interests in disjunctive poetry and critical literary and cultural theory in an effort to contest or, at the very least, problematize specific histories of ideas most related to Postcolonial Studies. The research I will carry out will lead to the creation of a poetry manuscript, “Boyhood Thinks” and a scholarly essay, “These Noises of Diaspora.” Together they will introduce a scene of diaspora, what I wish to define, borrowing from Judith Butler’s theories on subjection, as melancholy diaspora/refused idenfication. As a whole, “Boyhood Thinks” and “These Noises of Diaspora” will make the argument that notions of diaspora lead to a melancholia that prevents subjects from participating fully in the residence of their present topos, which, in my poems, is Canada. As a CRRAR fellow, I wish to further strengthen the ontological significances of my thesis project, especially the ways in which it attempts to suture genres of written argumentation together (through poetry and theory, poet/theorist), privileging the importance of considering the suasive effects of imaginative interventions into specific conversations on the verity of certain ideas. 

 

Matthew  Pezzaniti

Matthew Pezzaniti

I have just begun my Master's degree in philosophy at the University of Windsor. Before coming to the University of Windsor I completed my Bachelors of Arts Honours in philosophy at Saint Mary's University.  
 
 
I am currently enrolled in Dr. Hansen's graduate seminar course on logic and argumentation. In this course we are exploring the relationship between informal logic and argumentation.  I hope that this course as well as the work I complete at CRRAR will inform a thesis concerning informal logic. 

 

 

Student Fellows - Winter 2013

 

Jamie Sewell

Jamie's interests, characterized broadly, include: feminist philosophy, social and political philosophy, critical theory, philosophy of education, and Eastern philosophy (especially Taoism and Zen Buddhism).

Currently, her research interests have focused around the intersections between feminist critiques of pedagogical ideals and practices, philosophies of education, and critical thinking. Jamie started working on her Master’s thesis four months ago – generously funded by SSHRC – the title of which is “bell hooks on Engaged Pedagogy: Critiques and Constructions of Teaching Practices concerning Critical Thinking”. This thesis' primary concern is with critiquing ideals and practices of teaching that reinforce systems of domination and/or exclusion, while exploring hooks’ account of practices which she suggests can lead to positive social and political action.

The aim of Jamie's project is to be able to point to possible avenues by which learning communities within Canada can move away from a ‘banking-system’ of education, and toward a system of education that represents values of inclusion and justice; a system which concentrates on critical thinking and development from within, rather than ‘producing’ graduates by imposition from without.

 

 

 

Jason Boose

Jason is pursuing a Master’s degree in political science at the University of Windsor. In general, Jason's research interests include comparative politics and comparative public policy of both the developed and developing world. More specifically, his interest is in Canada-US relations, counterterrorism policy, politics of the Middle East, and democratization. Moreover, Jason is interested in political theory, research methods and approaches to political science. Jason's research paper is a study of US counterterrorism policy post-9/11. Jason's research interest in political parties and the rhetoric they use during election cycles to secure votes and manipulate public opinion and voter perceptions. The work that will be conducted as a CRRAR fellow will be analyzing the argumentation in the recent Alberta provincial election.