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Current Courses

 
FALL 2015
 
14-51-160. Animals and Humans in Society (Fall 2015)
 
This course will explore and consider the different types of relationships between animals and humans in contemporary society from a variety of physical, social, and psychological perspectives. Topics may include companion animals, animal rights and welfare, animals and food and entertainment, human-animal violence, and animal-assisted therapy. (Can be taken for either Social Science or Arts credit.)
 
14-51-261. Animals and the Law (Fall 2015)
 
This course, for undergraduate non-law majors, focuses on the role of law in human-animal interactions and the balancing of competing interests within traditional areas of law. Students will explore and debate the major issues surrounding animal welfare, rights, and protection, including the legal status of animals as living property, and the evolving societal beliefs and values surrounding these issues. The course will primarily focus on examining and comparing the laws of Canada and the United States, although laws and constitutions of other countries, as well as international law, will also be considered. (Prerequisite: 51-160.) (Can be taken as either a Social Science or Arts option.)
 
WINTER 2015
 
14-51-260. Animals For Sport and Entertainment (Winter 2015)
 
Building on Animals and Humans in Society (51-160), this course will focus on many of the issues, controversies, and paradoxes, which are inherent to human relationships with animals as companions, for human entertainment, and animals in sports. Students will be expected to engage in meaningful discussions and readings, both verbally and through their own writing, applying different perspectives (i.e. historical, sociological, cultural, etc.) to relevant topics. Potential topics for this class include: animal fighting as entertainment (cockfighting, dog fighting, bullbaiting, etc.); zoos and aquaria; circuses and rodeos; pedigree dogs and dog shows; and racing (greyhounds and horses). (Prerequisite: 51-160 or 02-160.) (Can be taken as either a Social Science or Arts option.)
 
FALL 2014
 
14-51-160. Animals and Humans in Society (Fall 2014)
 
This course will explore and consider the different types of relationships between animals and humans in contemporary society from a variety of physical, social, and psychological perspectives. Topics may include companion animals, animal rights and welfare, animals and food and entertainment, human-animal violence, and animal-assisted therapy. (Can be taken for either Social Science or Arts credit.)
 
14-51-260. Animals For Sport and Entertainment (Fall 2014)
 
Building on Animals and Humans in Society (51-160), this course will focus on many of the issues, controversies, and paradoxes, which are inherent to human relationships with animals as companions, for human entertainment, and animals in sports. Students will be expected to engage in meaningful discussions and readings, both verbally and through their own writing, applying different perspectives (i.e. historical, sociological, cultural, etc.) to relevant topics. Potential topics for this class include: animal fighting as entertainment (cockfighting, dog fighting, bullbaiting, etc.); zoos and aquaria; circuses and rodeos; pedigree dogs and dog shows; and racing (greyhounds and horses). (Prerequisite: 51-160 or 02-160.) (Can be taken as either a Social Science or Arts option.)
 
14-51-261. Animals and the Law (Fall 2014)
 
This course, for undergraduate non-law majors, focuses on the role of law in human-animal interactions and the balancing of competing interests within traditional areas of law. Students will explore and debate the major issues surrounding animal welfare, rights, and protection, including the legal status of animals as living property, and the evolving societal beliefs and values surrounding these issues. The course will primarily focus on examining and comparing the laws of Canada and the United States, although laws and constitutions of other countries, as well as international law, will also be considered. (Prerequisite: 51-160.) (Can be taken as either a Social Science or Arts option.)